Tag Archives: africa

In the digital world we are all developing countries: what Cambridge Analytica can tell us about limited statehood in the West

Watching the last week’s coverage of the trainwreck that is Cambridge Analytica’s involvement in the US elections, I’ve been struck principally by its ethnocentrity. (I research digital data and representation, so unfortunately I wasn’t surprised that our digital selves are, as Julie Cohen has put it, being farmed and essentially sold like cattle to the […]

Surveil the rich, observe the poor: big data at the Internet Governance Forum 2013

This year’s IGF was, unsurprisingly, permeated by the issue of surveillance. Almost every discussion landed on it sooner or later, led partly by the Forum’s headlining of issues of cybersecurity and online freedom.  This led to the use of the term ‘big data’ almost exclusively to mean personal data, and to denote a particular kind […]

The scramble for Africa’s data: resource grab or development opportunity?

After the last decade’s exponential rise in ICT use, Africa is fast becoming a source of big data. Africans are increasingly emitting digital information with their mobile phone calls, internet use and various forms of digitised transactions, while on a state level e-government starts to become a reality. African data, however, is not only valuable […]