Tag Archives: violence

Group Privacy: taking the discussion forward

What follows is an account of the group privacy session at the Amsterdam Privacy Conference on October 8, 2018. This is the precursor to a new round of debates on this topic with a view to producing a book or journal special issue. It links to this previous discussion, which resulted in the book Group […]

In the digital world we are all developing countries: what Cambridge Analytica can tell us about limited statehood in the West

Watching the last week’s coverage of the trainwreck that is Cambridge Analytica’s involvement in the US elections, I’ve been struck principally by its ethnocentrity. (I research digital data and representation, so unfortunately I wasn’t surprised that our digital selves are, as Julie Cohen has put it, being farmed and essentially sold like cattle to the […]

Violence in the age of visibility

In a recent paper, Dennis Broeders and I suggested that in the era of big data, we see rather than read. States have traditionally gathered data on their citizens in person, through survey methods, and have used those data to inform policymaking. James C Scott, in his book Seeing Like a State, refers to this […]